Description

Description

Feminist therapy is a set of related therapies arising from what proponents see as a disparity between the origin of most psychological theories and the majority of people seeking counseling being female. It focuses on societal, cultural, and political causes and solutions to issues faced in the counseling process. It openly encourages the client to participate in the world in a more social and political way.

Feminist therapy contends that women are in a disadvantaged position in the world due to sex, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, religion, age and other categories. Feminist therapists argue that many problems that arise in therapy are due to disempowering social forces; thus the goal of therapy is to recognize these forces and empower the client. In a feminist therapy setting the therapist and client work as equals. The therapist must demystify therapy from the beginning to show the client that she is her own rescuer, and the expectations, roles, and responsibilities of both client and therapist must be explored and equally agreed upon.

What to Expect

What to Expect

Feminist Therapy focuses on empowering women and helping them discover how to break the stereotypes and molds of some traditional roles that women play that may be blocking their development and growth.

Feminist therapy focuses on strengthening women in areas such as assertiveness, communication, relationships, and self-esteem. One of the main goals of feminist therapists is to develop equal mutual relationships of caring and support. The therapist believes that her client is the only “expert” in her own issues and will help her develop the tools needed to reach her potential as a unique and valuable individual.

Videos

Videos

How Can Women Build Confidence
Women's Empowerment
Personal Look at Empowering Women
Does Religion Suppress Womens Sexuality

Resourcess

Resources

Rowan, John. “AHP A Guids to Humanistic Psychology.” 2001. Association for Humanistic Psychology. 25 Nov. 2008 <http://www.ahpweb.org/rowan_bibliography/chapter16.html>.

Rowan, John. “AHP A Guids to Humanistic Psychology.” 2001. Association for Humanistic Psychology. 25 Nov. 2008 <http://www.ahpweb.org/rowan_bibliography/chapter16.html>.

Byram Fowles, Tammie. “Contributions to Feminist Therapy.” Psych-Net- UK. 25 Nov. 2008 <http://www.psychnet-uk.com/readers_articles/contributions%20of%20feminist%20theory.htm>.

Walker, Lenore. “A Feminist Therapist Reviews the Case.” Women As Therapists. Cantor, Dorothy. 1990. as cited in Byram Fowles, Tammie. “Contributions to Feminist Therapy.” Psych-Net- UK. 25 Nov. 2008 <http://www.psychnet-uk.com/readers_articles/contributions%20of%20feminist%20theory.htm>.

“Feminist Therapy Code of Ethics.” Feminist Therapy Institute: Feminist Therapy Code of Ethics. 1999. Feminist Therapy Institute. 25 Nov. 2008 <http://www.feminist-therapy-institute.org/ethics.htm>.

Cantor, Dorothy. 1990. as cited in Byram Fowles, Tammie. “Contributions to Feminist Therapy.” Psych-Net- UK. 25 Nov. 2008 <http://www.psychnet-uk.com/readers_articles/contributions%20of%20feminist%20theory.htm>.

Other resources:

The Feminist Psychology Institute
http://www.apadivisions.org/division-35/leadership/task-forces/institute/index.aspx

Additional Resources

No additional information was found for this therapy discipline. Feel free to use the search above for therapists that provide this service.